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COLOR

E l e m e n t s
Color | Value | Line | Texture | Shape | Form | Space

P r i n c i p a l s
Balance | Emphasis | Harmony | Variety | Gradation
 
Movement | Rhythm | Proportion

T e r m s
Look for more terms here

Color
An element of art which has three properties.  (1) Hue, which is the name of a color. For example,  red, yellow, blue.   (2) Intensity, which refers to the brightness and purity of a color.  For example, bright red or dull red.   (3) Value, which refers to the lightness or darkness of a color.

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Hue
Hue refers to the name of a color.  Eg.  Red, blue, and purple.

Intensity
It is not always enough to know the hue of a color, since a color has many different shades.  

Intensity is used to describe the brightness and purity of a color.    When a hue is strong and bright, it is said to be high in intensity.  When a color is faint, dull and gray, it is said to be low in intensity.

Intensities of Green

ValueScale-Intensity

High Intensity

Low Intensity

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Value in Color
When describing a hue, value refers to its lightness or darkness.  Value changes are often obtained by adding black or white to a hue.

Here is an example of a value scale that has values ranging from the darkest dark, to the whitest white

ValueScale-BW

Shade

Tint

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The Color Wheel
A color wheel is often used to help explain and understand color.

ColorWheel
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Primary Colors
The three primary colors are red, yellow, and blue.  They are called primary colors because they could be mixed to make all the other colors, but mixing other colors cannot make them.

ColorWheel-PrimaryColors
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Secondary Colors
The secondary colors are orange, green and violet. Mixing equal amounts of two primary colors together makes secondary colors.   As a result, they are located midway between the primary colors on the color wheel. Orange is made by mixing red and yellow, green is made by mixing blue and yellow, and violet is mixed by blue and red.

ColorWheel-SecondaryColors
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Tertiary Colors
Tertiary colors are also known as intermediate colors.    Both terms refers to the colors found between the primary and secondary colors.   Mixing uneven amounts of two primary colors together makes tertiary colors.   Examples of tertiary colors are Yellow-Green, Blue-Green, Blue-Violet and Red-Violet.

ColorWheel-TeriaryColors
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Complementary Colors
Complementary colors are also known as opposite colors.  The term refers to two colors that are directly opposite to each other on the color wheel.   For example, blue and orange are complementary colors.   Because there are no orange hue in blue and there are no blue hue in orange, you could say there no other color in the color wheel that is as different as blue and orange.

Since complementary colors are opposite colors, when two complementary colors are mixed together in equal amounts, they will cancel each other out and form a neutral gray tone.  This could be thought of as mixing a cup of hot water and cold water together to get a cup of warm water, because the hot water and cold water neutralized one another.

ColorWheel-Comp1 ColorWheel-Comp3 ColorWheel-Comp2 ColorWheel-Comp4

Here are some examples of complementary colors

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Warm and Cool Colors
Warm colors consist of red, yellow and orange.   They are referred to as warm colors because they are usually found in things such as fire and that sun which gives off heat and make people feel warm.  Cool colors consist of blue, green and violet.   Could you guess why they are called cool colors???

ColorWheel-WarmColors

Warm Colors

ColorWheel-CoolColors

Cool Colors

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C o l o r   T h e o r y
Learn more about Color Theory

E l e m e n t s
Color | Value | Line | Texture | Shape | Form | Space

P r i n c i p a l s
Balance | Emphasis | Harmony | Variety | Gradation
 
Movement | Rhythm | Proportion

T e r m s
Look for more terms here

 

 

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